Tag Archives: fandom

Resources – Weena Comes Out, My First Fursuit Video

Some resources we post here are more for educators’ edification. Sometimes these are pop- or Internet-culture things we expect students may know about, but educators might not; sometimes these are to help guide you on more sensitive subjects which you might be concerned about presenting in the classroom. Obviously, these are resources you might share with your students, too, if you wish!

Many people are still trying to figure out for themselves what “furries” are all about. We find that, rather than taking the word of journalists and TV personalities who are outside of this subculture of people who enjoy grown-up anthropomorphic animal comics, movies, sports mascots, and costumes, it’s more effective to learn from the people themselves. So we recommend starting with the definition provided by Anthrocon, one of the largest furry conventions in the US. And the rest of the Anthrocon site may further satisfy your curiosity.
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Resources – Theme Song

Some resources we post here are more for educators’ edification. Sometimes these are pop- or Internet-culture things we expect students may know about, but educators might not; sometimes these are to help guide you on more sensitive subjects which you might be concerned about presenting in the classroom. Obviously, these are resources you might share with your students, too, if you wish!

The word in this episode which we think might confuse a few people is filking. No, it’s not as bad as you think. “Filking” is a word which comes from science fiction fan communities; it means writing folk songs about your favorite shows or books, or about the experience of being a fan.
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Viral video: Which communities work?

In the fall of 2009, Abby, Gus, and social networking intern Lindsay sat down to discuss outreach. We decided to follow a “watch where you are” strategy, trying to reach viewers where they were already viewing, sharing, critiquing, and remaking videos with their friends. But which communities would best support the kind of interaction we needed — comments and responses which would spark new episodes and discussions with us?
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