Category Archives: 090316 – Snopes Before You Send (Again)

Category for an episode.

One Year On: A Report

When The Media Show had been in production for about a year, AfterEd TV’s managers asked me to write up a summary of the past year. This was what I wrote, covering production, publicity, and distribution. Note that our take on YouTube and deviantArt has changed in the year since.

Look at the episodes before and after this document. Did we manage to make the appropriate changes? Which parts of this assessment were correct, and which do you think were off-base?

Production

Weekly production may be overrated.

By now, we have a good, if small, core of subscribers on YouTube and followers on Facebook. A large number of our YouTube views come from the subscriber pages. This probably means people are finding us automatically, without being reminded a new episode is up because of what day it is.
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Lesson Resources – Snopes Before You Send

Just two resources for this video — snopes.com and factcheck.org. We can’t recommend them highly enough! Established in 1995, Snopes is run by Barbara and David Mikkelson, two folklorists and web developers who keep the site focused not only on Internet hoaxes, forwards, and rumors, but also urban legends. Factcheck.org is run by the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania, and focuses its attentions on statements made by political players in journalism, ads, and press releases.

Viral video: Which communities work?

In the fall of 2009, Abby, Gus, and social networking intern Lindsay sat down to discuss outreach. We decided to follow a “watch where you are” strategy, trying to reach viewers where they were already viewing, sharing, critiquing, and remaking videos with their friends. But which communities would best support the kind of interaction we needed — comments and responses which would spark new episodes and discussions with us?
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Before and After: Snopes

There were a few videos we shot more than once. For instance, we made two versions of the Snopes Before You Send episode.

We improvised the first version, without a script. It turned out ok, but we thought it was an important enough message that we decided to do it again, with a better script and higher production values. The second time, it appeared as part of our series of “public service announcements,” which we hoped viewers would forward around to their friends and family.

What are the differences you notice in the production values between the first and second episode? Do you think the changes were effective? Make a note of particular visual elements to make your case. How do you think the changes to the script affected the message?